UCreate Build status Nuget

Create doc types, media types, data types, member types and member groups for Umbraco 7 using a code-first approach. Inspired by USiteBuilder.

Available on NuGet

PM> Install-Package UCreate

Usage

The only configuration you'll need to get started is an app setting in your web.config. This tells UCreate to sync your doc types, media types, data types, member types and member groups on application start.

...
<appSettings>
    ...
    <add key="UCreateSyncEnabled" value="true" />
    ...
</appSettings>
...

DocType example

Doc types support property inheritance. Here is a list of available icons.

[DocType(Name = "Page With Title",
    Icon = "icon-zip color-blue",
    AllowedAsRoot = true,
    AllowedTemplates = new[] { "PageWithTitle" },
    DefaultTemplate = "PageWithTitle")]
public class PageWithTitle : BaseDocType
{
    public PageWithTitle(IPublishedContent content) : base(content)
    { }

    [Property(Alias = "heading", TypeName = PropertyTypes.Textstring, Description = "Heading for page", Mandatory = true, TabName = "Content")]
    public string Heading { get; set; }
}

MediaType example

Media types support property inheritance.

[MediaType(Name = "Folder With Cover",
    Icon = "icon-folder color-blue",
    AllowedAsRoot = true,
    IsContainer = true,
    AllowedTypes = new[] { "FolderWithCover", "Image" })]
public class FolderWithCover
{
    [Property(Alias = "coverImage", TypeName = PropertyTypes.MediaPicker, Description = "Cover image.", Mandatory = true)]
    public string CoverImage { get; set; }
}

DataType with prevalues example

[DataType(EditorAlias = Umbraco.Core.Constants.PropertyEditors.ColorPickerAlias,
    Name = "Nice Color Picker",
    Key = "1bfca1e7-95d0-485e-bd94-9fe9c2b8821f",
    DBType = DataTypeDatabaseType.Nvarchar)]
public class NiceColorPicker : IHasPreValues
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Implementing PreValues
    /// </summary>
    public IDictionary<string, PreValue> PreValues
    {
        get
        {
            return new Dictionary<string, PreValue> {
                {"1", new PreValue("ff00ff")},
                {"2", new PreValue("1f00f1")},
                {"3", new PreValue("123123")},
                {"4", new PreValue("ffffff")}
            };
        }
    }
}

MemberType example

[MemberType(Name = "Employee", Description = "Member who represents an employee", Icon = "icon-user color-green")]
public class Employee
{
    [MemberProperty(Alias = "jobTitle", TypeName = PropertyTypes.Textstring, Description = "Employee's job title", Mandatory = true, TabName = "Job Details", CanEdit = true, ShowOnProfile = true)]
    public string JobTitle { get; set; }

    [MemberProperty(Alias = "jobDescription", TypeName = PropertyTypes.Textboxmultiple, Description = "Employee's job description", Mandatory = false, TabName = "Job Details", CanEdit = true, ShowOnProfile = false)]
    public string JobDescription { get; set; }

    [MemberProperty(Alias = "profilePicture", TypeName = PropertyTypes.MediaPicker, Description = "Admin profile picture", Mandatory = false, CanEdit = true, ShowOnProfile = true)]
    public string ProfilePicture { get; set; }
}

MemberGroup example

[MemberGroup(Name = "Staff")]
public class Staff
{
}

Strongly typed views

In order to use your doc types on the front-end you need to enable the PublishedContentModel factory. UCreate can do this for you if add the following app setting:

...
<appSettings>
    ...
    <add key="UCreatePublishedModelsEnabled" value="true" />
    ...
</appSettings>
...

Then using the doc types in your views is pretty simple.

@inherits UmbracoTemplatePage<PageWithTitle>

@{
    Layout = null;
}

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width" />
    <title>PageWithTitle</title>
</head>
<body>
    <h1>@Model.Content.Heading</h1>
</body>
</html>